Conference Sessions & Workshops

Conference Sessions & Workshops

C2C 2019 features over 50 sessions, workshops, field studies and activities to choose from.

Pre-registration is not required for breakout sessions. You can just attend the session of your choosing when they are offered. We are emphasizing quality over quantity, so are trying to keep session numbers to an average of 15-20 people each.

MORNING (11:00 – 11:50am)

# Session Title/ Location Presenters/ Facilitators Details
1 Indigenous Land-Based Education: Truth, Reconciliation and Resurgence

(Ponderosa Ballroom A)

Vicki Kelly,
Paula Rosehart, SFU
This workshop explores capacity building in the area of Indigenous Education: Truth, Reconciliation and Indigenous Resurgence. More specifically, how the focus on Indigenous Worldviews, Knowledges & Perspectives provides opportunities for teachers to embed Indigenous Land-based Pedagogies, Making and Two-eyed seeing into their classes. This session is interactive and involves making.
2 An Introduction to Place-Based Education in BC’s New Curriculum

(Ponderosa Ballroom B)

Nick Townley, VSB;
Laura Jackman, EEPSA
An interactive discussion on the role of experiential and place-based learning in the new curriculum, including its connection to the First People’s Principles of Learning. How can we facilitate more experiential, inquiry-based, environmental and place-based education in all subject areas and grade levels? We will also explore rich, classroom-ready resources from across B.C. and Canada.
3 Connecting Classroom Learning/Inquiry on Climate Change to Community Observations

(Scarfe Building – Room 1211)

Jennifer Putland,
Monika Pelz
,
Codie Tolmie
, Ocean Networks Canada
The Ocean engages students and is an effective vehicle through which to teach Climate Change. Our workshop will model how teachers, wherever they may reside, can engage students in classrooms and connect them with communities who host data that they can use to test their inquiry hypotheses regarding climate change.
4 Framing Ocean Literacy in Vancouver

(Scarfe Building – Room 1214)

David Zandvliet, Lilia Yumagalova, SFU This workshop will use a combination of place-based education strategies and principles to facilitate a dialogue on ocean literacy principles. Perspectives on ocean literacy will include international guidelines augmented by a variety of local perspectives.
5 Science as a Place-Based Learning Program

(Henry Angus – Room 435)

Cathy Clegg,
Karen Birchenall
, Brockton School
Have you ever wanted to take the time to explore with like-minded professionals how to shift the science curriculum from the classroom to learning outside? This is the group for you. We will bring examples of how lessons have been taught through place-based learning and while learning the content, and exploring the competencies students are discovering a connection to place.
6a  

Getting Beyond Ecophobia in Our Classrooms

(Henry Angus – Room 335)

 

Stephanie Sy

 

Do your students suffer from “ecophobia,” a fear and dislike of nature and environmental problems? This workshop provides theoretical background knowledge on this concept, a chance to reflect on your practice, and practical ways to break down ecophobic attitudes and get back outside with students!
6b  

It’s Okay to be Vulnerable – You are Safe Here

(Henry Angus – Room 335)

Karen Lai  

Outdoors is the ideal setting for inclusion of people with disabilities to take place. Explore strategies to include all learners through place-based approaches.

7a First Peoples Principles of Learning and Collaborative Ethnography: A Place Based Approach to Student Self-Assessment

(Henry Angus – Room 295)

 

Alexa Charles, SD 43 (Coquitlam)

 

Exploring First Peoples Principles of Learning, Artistic Expression, and Collaborative Ethnography: How a Place-Based, student driven approach moved the discussion outside and transformed the way I teach BC’s Core Competencies and support student self-assessment.
7b  

Rooted in Place

(Henry Angus – Room 295)

 

Sarah Bainbridge, Cheakamus Centre Participants will imagine how enhancements to informal and formal learning environments can be guided by meaningful partnerships with local indigenous experts.
8 How to Start and Sustain Outdoor Learning in Your Teaching Practice

(Outdoors)

Cheryl Leclerc, Keri Stanger, Alison Leslie, East Kensington Elementary, SD 36 (Surrey) Come learn how to advocate for and sustain outdoor learning initiatives in your educational community. We will present some how-to’s for garnering support from your community to engage your classroom in regular, immersive outdoor learning.
9 Story Trail: An Interpretive Experience Driven by Indigenous Youth

(Outdoors)

Jennie McCaffrey, BC Parks Foundation This session will explore the evolution of the Story Trail, an interpretive trail driven by the Secwepemctsin language class at Chase Secondary. The project connects local language with native plant histories and stories through the voices of Indigenous youth. QR codes on each sign link to audio in English and Secwepemctsin.
10 Nature Notebooks

(Outdoors)

Erika Momeyer, CBEEN Use nature notebooks to engage even the most reluctant learner. Wake up your senses, find a thinking tree or discover a wonder strategy as we explore ways to engage your students in your community. Be prepared to make your own nature notebooks, play games, ask questions, share ideas and discover new resources.
11 A (Secondary) Series of Place-based Events

(Outdoors)

Colin Mayer, VSB & Syncollab Strategies This session is for you, high school teachers! With place and 21st century learning principles in mind, this session will share one teacher’s journey from wondering “How on Earth??” to “WOW, this works!” through reimagining and transforming what a rigorous high school science course could – and should – be.
12 Climate Change and Indigenous Perspectives: A path to Reconciliation

(Outdoors)

Johan Stroman, Heartwood Solutions;
Candace Campo, EEPSA
Join us for a rich dialogue on the opportunities and challenges of bringing climate change education to school in different settings. Participate and share in dialogue with your two hosts how we can create opportunity for community and educators to explore climate change, economic development, and reconciliation as we explore these together.
13 Design Your Own Place-based, Cross-Disciplinary Session

(Outdoors)

Lee Beavington, SFU;
Daniella Roze, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
We will blend learning methodologies that promote critical thinking, ecological principles, and philosophical consideration. In this session, participants will be guided through a place-based activity, suitable for all learner ages, and then be invited to creatively brainstorm their own cross-disciplinary activities.
14 Beyond Recycling: Educating in the Time of Climate Emergency

(Outdoors)

Laura Piersol, SFU;
Jenny Groves
, SD 46 (Sunshine Coast)
We have 11 years left to help prevent irreversible damage due to human induced climate change. Our students are striking on a global level #Fridaysforfuture. What is our role as educators in this work and how might we catalyze meaningful change? Let’s find power in the collective!
15 Create a Beautiful System for Place-Based Learning in your Region

(Outdoors)

Duncan Whittick, CBEEN In this session, participants will be able to see an example of an effective model for supporting place-based learning in B.C., and then they will break out into groups representing regions across B.C. and create their own model.

AFTERNOON (1:30 – 2:20pm)

# Session Title/ Location Presenters/ Facilitators Details
1 Environmental Violence and Environmental Action: What we can do Together

(Ponderosa Ballroom A)

Richard Kool, Royal Roads University Violence underlies many of our concerns as environmental educators, yet it is a word rarely spoken of in our practice. This interactive presentation will present an analysis of environmental violence, and ask participants to collaborate in considering ways of addressing it in our classrooms and communities through three different action-based ‘lenses’.
2 Peoples and Places In Career Education: Preparing the Next Generation

(Ponderosa Ballroom B)

Michele Sam, Michele A Sam Consulting;
Ryan Barfoot
, SD 47 (Powell River)
A facilitated dialogue focused upon Environmental Education and Indigenous Peoples Knowledges within the new Career Education curriculum. This is an opportunity to review a couple of examples of ‘what people are doing’ and the process of ‘getting there’ with time to share and shape ‘local to you’ possibilities.
3 Incorporating more Environmental Education and Action in the Classroom

(Henry Angus – Room 335)

Kieryn Matthews, Alex Johansen, Science World Using BC Green Games projects as examples, this workshop will demonstrate some best practices and helpful resources for integrating place-based, solutions-focused projects into the new curriculum. This will be followed by a discussion of the groups’ experiences with environmental education and then collaborating to create grade-specific action plans to incorporate more environmental learning into your classroom.
4 Land, Music and Action in Times like These

(Henry Angus – Room 435)

Luke Wallace, LukeWallace Music Join 26 year-old folk singer Luke Wallace in performance and dialogue where participants will dive deep into the world of music, activism, democracy and education.
5 From Climate Data to Climate Action

(Ponderosa Commons: Oak House – Room 1008)

Melanie Lazelle,
Jennifer Fischer,
BC Sustainable Energy Assoc
This workshop will provide inspiration and tools for educators and partners to see climate information and data and the climate narrative translate into tangible action. The workshop explores how to inspire individual behaviour change with fun tools and activities, and using action projects to catalyse collective community action.
6 LEAF Certificate and Capstone Projects

(Ponderosa Commons: Oak House – Room 1009)

Lori York,
Scott McKeen
, Matthew Barski, VSB
We would like to share our ideas for LEAF programming with other districts and potential community partners.   We would like to engage educators in a feedback loop about how the program could be implemented in different school environments, and lead them through a process of identifying benefits and barriers to using the LEAF Certificate model potentially province-wide.
7 Shared Planet, Shared Responsibilities

(Ponderosa Commons: Oak House – Room 1215)

Rachael Bell-Irving,
Julia Wakeling
, Ocean Wise
Ocean Wise Service Learning and Online educators will lead a discussion on activating geographically diverse communities to participate in ocean conservation. Through innovative digital, in person, and direct action initiatives guided by Sustainable Development Goals, discover how connecting with both urban and rural cultures can provide opportunities for protecting our oceans.
8 Creating an Outdoor, Place-Based Classroom on School Grounds

(Outdoors)

Luisa Richardson,
Laura Bamsey
,
Janet May, HCTF Education
Create an outdoor classroom: Whether a simple seating circle, a naturescape that increases habitat and biodiversity for native species, a space to interweave First People’s traditional knowledge, this workshop provides a road map and hands-on activities that will enrich your knowledge of place and help you navigate common obstacles encountered.

AFTERNOON (2:30 – 3:20pm)

# Session Title/ Location Presenters/ Facilitators Details
1 The Best of C2C-BC: Success Stories from Local Chapters of EEPSA

(Jack Poole Hall – UBC Alumni Centre)

Selina Metcalfe,
Laura Jackman
,
Keri Lanaway
, EEPSA
Join leaders from Local Chapters of EEPSA across B.C. as they share their success stories around how they are creating community, sharing resources, hosting professional development, advocating for change and communicating successes in their school districts. If you are a teacher who wants to initiate change in your district, but aren’t sure quite how to do it, this practical walk shop will introduce you to a network of sustained mentorship and inspire you to be the leader you have been waiting for!
2 Invasive-Wise British Columbia – Tackling Invasive Species Hands-on!

(Henry Angus – Room 435)

Sue Staniforth, Invasive Species Council of BC Invasive species are a serious issue world-wide, representing the second greatest threat to biodiversity after habitat loss. Young people are a key audience; invasive species, unlike many large-scale environmental issues, are something that students can actually do something about, in a hands-on, experiential way. This session will provide a variety of educational strategies, hands-on activities, Indigenous and youth partnership programs and fieldwork planning tools that support youth in tackling invasive species in their communities.
3 NO TIME LIKE NOW: Authentic Learning for Global Sustainability

(Henry Angus – Room 335)

Maureen Jack-Lacroix, Be the Change Earth Alliance In this interactive workshop, participants will explore how Student Leadership for Change (SLC) inquiry-based learning resources flip the classroom to help students develop critical thinking skills. SLC connects larger societal issues, such as climate change, with individual actions and local activities to empower students with a sense of agency.
4 Food Justice

(Ponderosa Commons: Oak House – Room 1008)

Emily Gorham, Check Your Head Where does our food come from and why does it matter? This workshop addresses the globalization of the food industry and how food-related policies affect the lives of both food producers and us as consumers! Participants will learn how to take steps towards creating food justice in their communities.
5a Strengthening Youth Advocacy and Community Connections through Community Art Projects

(Ponderosa Ballroom B)

Ciera DeSilva, Sierra Club BC Pondering how to address climate grief and inspire student action? Come explore powerful examples of community art projects in BC, including details to help you map out partnerships that represent your community’s diversity. Learn to give youth agency, engage them across subject areas, and involve entire schools and broader communities.
5b My Climate Story – Youth Perspectives on Climate Change in BC

(Ponderosa Ballroom B)

Cherry Tam, Fraser Basin Council My Climate Story is an online storymap platform that provides a space for BC youth to share their diverse perspectives on how climate change affects them and their communities, and showcases inspiring youth-led climate solutions and communicates opportunities to take action and create a positive narrative for the future.
6  

Natural Curiosity: Importance of Indigenous Perspectives in Children’s Environmental Inquiry

(Ponderosa Ballroom A)

Rosa Na, Natural Curiosity Come explore Natural Curiosity’s four-branch pedagogical framework for children’s environmental inquiry, deepened by a newly expanded Indigenous lens. Ignite the fire of your professional learning by engaging in a group knowledge building discussion around how we can help children reclaim the local world as their family.
7 Land Based STEM

(Outdoors)

Stephen Ji, Geering Up UBC Engineering Outreach This workshop will explore how you can incorporate land-based learning in your science curriculum. We will share our experiences from running land-based camps and day camps in rural and Indigenous communities. You will leave this session with activity ideas and inspiration on how to connect science and engineering with outdoor activities.
8 Transforming a “Space” into a “PLACE”

(Outdoors)

Andrea Barnes, Alberta Environment and Parks During this outdoor, experiential session we will move through place and land-based learning experiences including gratitude, nature games, map-making, storytelling, sensory activities, reciprocity, and knowing your relations. Through these activities, we will share and explore the fundamentals that will help turn a local ‘space’ into your special learning ‘PLACE’.

AFTERNOON (1:30 – 3:20pm)

# Session Title/Location Presenters/ Facilitators Details
9 Risk, Playful Inquiry, and Loose Parts Outdoors

(Outdoors)

Megan Zeni, School District 38 (Richmond) & UBC The practice of playful inquiry is built on the shoulders of longstanding theories and pedagogical beliefs. My practice of playful inquiry in an outdoor and garden classroom highlights a pedagogy of place, an emergent curriculum, and a deep trust that children will uncover the learning that lives in nature through meaningful exploration and play, including risky play. This session will share observations and documentations of playful inquiry outdoors, while emphasizing a pedagogy of play in nature that sustains cross-curricular learning and growth across the core competencies.
10 Indigenous Art Tour of UBC Campus

(Outdoors)

Shannon Leddy, Jill Baird, Naomi Sawada, Amber Shilling, UBC This walking tour is the beta run of a semi-self-guided tour being developed jointly by members of the Faculty of Education, The Belkin Gallery and The Museum of Anthropology.  Participants will follow a route designed to maximize exposure to the Indigenous art works that dot the campus as a means of reconsidering place and the power of Indigenous self-representation.
11 Tools to get OUTSIDE Tomorrow and Foster Community

(Outdoors)

Laura Jackman, EEPSA;
Matt Gale
, SD 20 (Kootenay-Columbia)
During this session we will give you the tools you need to take your class outside tomorrow. We have gone through all of the K-12 BC curriculum and developed an outdoor activity for every subject area. A follow up discussion on differentiation will allow you to apply these activities at any grade level. We have discovered that by taking our students outside regularly and for all subject areas, we have been able to develop a strong sense of community that fosters learning even when we return to our indoor classrooms.
12 Wayfinding Curriculum Beyond the Classroom

(Outdoors)

Marnie Olsen, Lisa Fox, HCTF Education Experience outdoor strategies of inquiry and place-based education that engage students in their surroundings without being an expert in ecology, geography or science. Explore grade-specific examples of place-based education and discover specific steps for wayfinding your program planning. Take away teaching strategies and resources that connect your classroom to community.
13 Place-Based Campus Challenge

(Outdoors)

Teresa Rowley, UBC & School District 44 (North Vancouver) & EfS Cohort Members Join teacher candidates from UBC’s Education for Sustainability Cohort in the Place-Based Challenge! Explore the campus, ask questions and integrate technology to create a collaborative experience map of the learning possibilities that exist at UBC. This engaging activity could be easily replicated within your own schoolyard and community to stimulate place-based inquiry.
14 Learning and Being in the Wired and Wild Worlds

(Outdoors)

Yvonne Dawydiak, UBC Faculty of Education Interaction in today’s society is increasingly mediated through digital technologies. In this session, we will engage in some activities that will help us explore and critically evaluate learning at the intersection of the wired and wild worlds. This will include participating in some example learning opportunities provided to teacher candidates in the BEd program at UBC in collaboration with faculty in the program. Through this first-hand experience, we will consider the role of the virtual world in place-based learning and also think about how, when and why we might integrate digital technologies and when we might not. Be prepared to head outside for a portion of the session.
15 Trees Are Our Teachers

(Outdoors)

Liz Beattie,
Sandra Scott,

Douglas Adler,
UBC
Trees are an integral part of local communities. Walk with us as we meet some of UBC’s special trees and see/feel/hear what they have to teach us. Discover ways to include trees in place-based and inquiry learning across the curriculum.
16 Making Pathways

(Outdoors)

Rojia Dadashzadeh, Brockton School; Allison Hardy, UBC Within the outdoor ‘Park & Learn’ space at UBC, participants will create artifacts in response to prompts that aim to position their personal understandings of place. The artifacts will stay in the ‘Park & Learn’ garden. Participants will then lay pathways with natural materials, intertwining and tracing personal stories alongside one another.